| Follow Us:

In the News

1707 Articles | Page: | Show All

USA Today names Detroit RiverWalk one of America's 10 best riverfronts

The rehabilitation of a key stretch of downtown Detroit's riverfront gets a major shoutout in the national press.

Excerpt:

#9 - Detroit

"The riverfront redevelopment in Detroit, a city with 14 miles of shoreline along the Detroit River, is one of the city's most exciting initiatives. Stretching for 5.5 miles from the Ambassador Bridge to the Bell Isle Bridge, the Detroit International RiverWalk includes a cruise terminal, marina, several parks, restaurants, shops and hotels. In warmer months, the riverfront parks play host to festivals and community literacy and fitness programs."

More here.

Detroit aims to become Little Free Library capital of the world

Over 100 free little libraries have been spotted on Detroit streets, and the goal of getting 313 libraries circulating on Detroit streets is catching the eye of authors as far away as Alaska.
 
Excerpt:

"I write my books from a little house on an Alaska mountainside that’s 3000 miles from Detroit. My closest Little Free Library is another three miles up the mountain, along a winding road with views of Cook Inlet and, on clear days, a big beautiful mountain, which we Alaskans call Denali.

Distance and differences aside, I’m rooting for Detroit’s Little Free Library Challenge. Kim Kozlowski’s IndieGoGo project is all about the things we Alaskans believe in: community, resilience, and self-reliance, empowered by a deep and transcending appreciation—call it love—for the spaces around us."

More here.

Read here about the brains behind the little libraries.

Carhartt work clothing is the new vogue for makers and artisans

Carhartt has outfitted generations of farmers and trade professionals in its work clothing. Now hipsters and maker entrepreneurs are retooling their wardrobes with its canvas.

Excerpt:

"Tony Ambroza and  the Maker Movement  arrived at the Dearborn, Mich., offices of Carhartt about the same time four years ago. With stints at Nike and Under Armour under his belt, Ambroza decided to welcome young craftsmakers, artisans and Brooklyn hipsters to the Carhartt brand, known for sturdy canvas work clothes. The svp of marketing--the brand's top marketing post--obviously relates to makers "with blue-collar DNA" who create things with their hands instead of an app.

With Carhartt being a Detroit-area institution, you're getting a ground-level view of the changes in Motor City. Any surprises?

Detroit has become a magnet for the creative class from the millennial generation. I'm most amazed at the powerful sense of community among these young entrepreneurs and craftsmakers. They don't keep their work secret; they always seem to be on the lookout for how they can help each other."

More here.

DTE official says wind is the power of the future

When it comes to Michigan's energy options, it just may be that wind is the most inexhaustible.

Excerpt:

"Justifying the utility’s push for wind energy to provide electricity rather than coal, nuclear or solar sources, Chriss said coal is “not going to be working” because of strict regulation set by the Environmental Protection Agency for cleaner emissions.

And nuclear is out of the question too, he said.

“By 2025, there’s not going to be many coal plants around, period … nuclear cost $7 to $10 billion, you don’t want to shove $7 to $10 billion into your rates — you’ll throw us out of the place. Our company’s only worth $8 or $9 billion. No one’s going to decide to build an $8 or $9 billion nuke plant. Where are we going to put that? Where are we going to take the spent fuel rods? Anybody want them in their area?”

Up next was solar energy.

“Solar is not working, it’s working but it’s not working as great as we would like. We can’t run this town on solar, but we’re doing our best. Technology’s not there, clouds are in the way, we’re trying. We have a natural resource of wind. It’s here. It makes sense. You can’t run and do the NIMBY — not in my backyard."

More here.

Pontiac's Erebus no. 6 on America's Best Haunts list

The Miami Herald's travel section gave a shoutout to Southeast Michigan's Halloween attractions, which are always included among the nation's best places to get your ghost on. 

Excerpt:

"There’s no doubt Halloween attractions are getting scarier and more extreme,” said Larry Kirchner of HauntWorld.com, a website devoted to haunted attractions. With high-tech special effects, including video, animation and Hollywood-quality sets, “they are more sophisticated. They have gone to another level."

...In the Midwest, check out Wisconsin FearGrounds in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and Fear Fest, Flint, Michigan."

And the perennially scary Erebus was also mentioned. 

More here

Attend the Live.Work.Detroit. career and networking event on Oct. 24

Here's the scoop on this don't miss career event set for this Friday.

"Live.Work.Detroit. returns for networking, career matchmaking for college students and recent grads. Current college students and aspiring entrepreneurs are invited to attend this season’s edition of  Live.Work.Detroit. on  Friday, October 24  at St. Andrews Hall in Detroit from  2:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Live.Work.Detroit is an informative career event sponsored by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and hosted by D:hive. Participants are invited to hear from young Detroit professionals and an array of local employers including Challenge Detroit, Lowe Campbell Ewald, Peacock Room, Quicken Loans and Salem Communications. The event schedule consists of networking opportunities, a keynote presentation by Eric Larson, CEO of Downtown Detroit Partnership, and an Insider Tour with the Detroit Experience Factory.

Registration for the  October 24  event costs $15. The registration fee covers dinner, a tour of the city and transportation. Round trip bus transportation will be made available from University of Detroit Mercy, Michigan State University, University of Michigan, and Wayne State University."

For more info and to register, click here.

Take this survey and weigh in on Detroit's downtown!

Now's your chance to air your views on where downtown Detroit is and where you'd like to see it go. Complete the survey and you'll be entered to win a $100 gift card to Pure Detroit or Blumz by JRDesigns. The survey runs through October 31.

Why is DDP conducting this survey?
DDP’s goal is looking to better understand people’s interests, attitudes and perceptions about the Downtown Detroit neighborhood and set benchmarks to measure progress year after year.   The business improvement zone will establish performance measures based on survey results related to clean, safe and hospitality services provided for Downtown Detroit.

What will happen with the survey results – is this information being collected to impact plans to improve Detroit?
DDP will proactively use survey results to inform our programs and services to better serve businesses, residents and visitors contributing to Downtown’s revitalization. DDP also wants to tell the positive stories about living, working and experiencing the Downtown neighborhood.

Weigh in here.

Berliners envision defunct Fisher Body factory as dance club

Germans like Detroit grit: Visionaries there are thinking of retooling an abandoned factory into a dance club. And they're exploring sending their creatives to the city as resident artists.

Excerpt:

"On each of his last 15 visits to Detroit, Dimitri Hegemann has visited his old friend, Fisher Body 21...

Fisher Body 21 is a decrepit six-story building that is covered in graffiti, lined with smashed windows and, according to state authorities, dangerously contaminated. Built in 1919, the former auto-parts plant in Detroit was deserted two decades ago.

But where others see a case for the wrecking ball, Mr. Hegemann and his friends see the first step toward the revival of America's abandoned city...

Mr. Hegemann, founder of a Berlin nightclub and record label, is spearheading a project called the Detroit-Berlin Connection, an effort by the movers and shakers in this city's music scene to help restart the Motor City. The Berliners compare Detroit to their city after the fall of the Berlin Wall and say it has all the ingredients for a similar rebirth as a center of underground culture: deserted buildings, cheap rents and a gritty reputation...

Katja Lucker, head of the Berlin Music Board, a government-funded agency that promotes the city's music scene, said she is discussing funding a Detroit residency for German artists with officials in both cities. Ms. Lucker, a political appointee who wears Adidas high-tops and a Detroit Tigers jacket around town, said her trip to Detroit this May made her see the city as "a healing place" that would rejuvenate burnt-out artists. "People are jogging in the streets because there are no cars," she said. "It's so inspiring."

More here.

Car-less commuting still a stretch in Metro Detroit

Ranking 34th out of the nation's largest 46 metros in terms of job accessibility via mass transit, Metro Detroit still has a distance to go.

Excerpt:

"The rankings use both city geography and transit schedules to capture the full door-to-door commute experience: from the first mile it takes to reach a bus or train station, to the wait once you're there, to the travel time itself, to the last mile reaching the office. They are also weighted by time, with shorter trips favored over longer ones. So a 10-minute commute gives a city more accessibility points than a 60-minute commute."

More here.

And here

NY Times calls Detroit a "culinary oasis"

Used to be Detroit's dining scene barely got the leftover attention from national media outlets. Now they're at the table.

Excerpt:

"Keeping up with the dining scene in Detroit these days is a full-time job. It seems that every time I return from my travels, a flurry of emails from foodie friends informs me of yet another restaurant or distillery that has opened, or gastronomic “event” I have missed, like a “Book & Bread” dinner at the letterpress studio,  Salt & Cedar, where diners enjoy a feast of locally grown ingredients before hand-sewing a journal.

Considered a food desert not so long ago, Detroit is now a culinary oasis. In the last year alone, nearly a dozen new restaurants have opened, from  Grille Midtown  serving everything from jambalaya to rib-eyes in a renovated century-old former theater on Woodward Avenue, to  Craft Work, which serves seasonal cuisine in the historic district of West Village. And while the city has long been known for its great diversity of ethnic food and chili dogs, it is finally getting a reputation that reaches beyond ribs."

More here.

Atwater in the Park named one of nation's 10 best new beer halls

The beer tasters at Jetsetter.com are drinking the suds and the ambience at Atwater Brewery's new beer hall.

Excerpt:

"The most traditional beer hall of the list,  Atwater in the Park  opened in former Grosse Pointe Park church. Brew barrels now stand where the altar once sat, and long, communal tables have been fashioned out of reclaimed church pews. The menu skews German — think fresh kielbasa, pretzel baskets and smoked knockwurst — but the 40 drafts are from all over. The bulk or them are brewed in house (the bar also has a distillery license in the works), but about 15 of them are secured exclusively for to the Atwater in the Park taps."

More here

On the road to driverless car testing, development in Detroit

Detroit's automakers and suppliers are readying for the time when the brains behind the wheel will become automated.

Excerpt:

"Google’s driverless car may still be a work in progress, but the potential for semiautonomous vehicles on American roads is no longer the stuff of science fiction.

By the end of the decade, a growing number of automakers aim to offer some form of hands-off-the-wheel, feet-off-the-pedals highway driving where a driver can sit back and let the car take control...
G.M. made a splash last month by announcing that its Super Cruise technology — the company’s version of autonomous highway driving — will be available in two years on certain Cadillac models...

Gerald J. Witt, with the auto supplier Delphi, said the company was working on sophisticated driver monitoring that by 2016 could be ready for production vehicles. The system would know if a driver was being distracted or falling asleep at the wheel. The goal is to eventually tap into other aspects of the connected car, like the Internet connection, not only to warn drivers but also to offer timely suggestions."

More here.

Ferndale designer fashions dresses from paper

Dresses made from newspapers, bags, and condoms are hitting the haute couture circuit in Detroit.

Excerpt:

"By day, Matthew Richmond does social media and promotions for L'Esprit Academy beauty salon in Royal Oak. For the past eight years, he's made dresses out of paper on the side, and some big names have taken notice of his work. More on that later, though.

Why paper? "Because if I did it out of fabric no one would even care," Richmond laughs. The real reason, though, is more practical: Richmond doesn't know how to sew...

Richmond moved to Ferndale in 2009, and the next year a friend suggested he should pull off an "ambush." "I didn't even know what that was," he says. "She said that you just dress a bunch of models up and parade them in the street in a crowded area." So Richmond staged his own guerilla fashion show — and it paid off, making the rounds on social media.

"People have been doing it in New York city for years," Richmond says. "That's basically how I got recognized." He started getting attention from bigger media outlets. "I did an NPR station, and CBS did an online story, and then CNN picked it up and put it on their website," he says."

More here.

GM Tech Center receives National Historic Landmark designation

Warren's GM Tech Center was one of only nine sites around the country named as National Historic Landmarks in 2014.

Excerpt:

"The General Motors Technical Center (commonly known as the "GM Tech Center") is one of the most significant works of architect Eero Saarinen, who was among the most important modernist designers of the post-World War II period in the United States. The GM Tech Center marked Saarinen’s emergence onto the national stage and was the first of his four influential suburban corporate campuses that represented a sea change in American business facilities."

More here.

Royal Oak's Bastone Brewery wins national award at Great American Beer Festival

Bastone Brewery has a new award on tap: Small Brewpub and Small Brewpub Brewery of the Year.

Excerpt:

"The award is given to a brewery that produced fewer than 750 barrels in 2013; more than 1,300 total breweries were entered in the Great American Beer Festival competition; 23 competed in the Small Brewpub category.

The 10-year-old brewery, at 419 S. Main St., also was recognized for two beers: Thor’s Hammer in the Belgian-Style Strong Specialty Ale category; and Private Stock #472 in the Wood- and Barrel-Aged category. The two beers are not yet available."

More here.
1707 Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts